• Halibut en Papillote

    Fish en Papiotte

  • Honeydew & Lime Sorbet

    Honeydew & Lime Sorbet

  • Photo by Caroline West

    Carrot & Orange Soup

  • Chicken Consommé

    Sparkling Consommé

  • Cured Salmon

    Cured Salmon

  • Minestrone Soup

    Minestrone with Pistou

  • Lentils-2

    Lentil Salad


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Halibut en Papillote
Photo by Denise Marchessault

Fish en Papiotte

This simple recipe brings back one of my fondest food memories. I prepared this dish in France a few summers ago, when my family exchanged homes with a family from Bordeaux.  Our temporary French home was beautiful but ancient with an oven so small we named it Le Easy Bake. Whether your oven is big [...]

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Honeydew & Lime Sorbet
Photo by Denise Marchessault

Honeydew & Lime Sorbet

As soon as it’s sandal-wearing weather, I dust off my ice cream machine and start tinkering with sorbet (and ice cream) recipes. I’ve made sorbets with everything from grapefruit to cucumbers. Any sweetened fruit (or vegetable) juice works nicely, and it’s fun coming up with your own tasty variations.  Sorbets make refreshing desserts, welcome interludes [...]

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Photo by Caroline West
Photo by Denise Marchessault

Carrot & Orange Soup

You know your soup is good when you’re enjoying it cold from the refrigerator in the Tupperware container you stored it in.  It’s even better served warm. Carrot soup is pretty tame, some might say boring, until it’s cheered up with freshly grated spicy ginger, freshly squeezed orange juice and acidic tomatoes.  Now, that’s a [...]

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A message to the reluctant cook,

Sometimes you’ll scorch the rice, burn the sugar or overwork the dough.  You might under-cook, over-salt or overcrowd the pan.

I’ve made all these mistakes and plenty more.

But with every blunder, a new lesson unfolds. Knowing what NOT to do is as important as knowing what to do. If your cooking history is, um, colourful, consider yourself ahead of the curve.

With practice, you’ll learn to trust your senses:

Touch your food.  You’ll feel when the dough is ready or when the meat is perfectly cooked.

Smell  your food. Your nose knows if the fish is fresh or funky — or when the garlic’s about to burn.

Listen to the sizzle and the sputter.  It’s telling you if your pan’s the right (or wrong) temperature.

Watch your food. It’s always perfect — just before it burns.

Taste as  you cook.  You’ll know if the soup needs a pinch of salt or a squeeze of lemon.

Most importantly, relax and enjoy the pleasures of the kitchen. And have a glass of wine while you’re at it.

Just don’t toss in the apron!


Denise Marchessault